MEDICAL AUTOMATION EXPERTS


Terry Sharrer's bio:

Dr. Sharrer began as Executive Director, Medical Innovation and Transformation Institute, with the Inova Health System (Fairfax, VA) in July 2007. Formerly, he was the Curator of Health Sciences at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, where he had worked for thirty-six years.

Terry Sharrer speaks and writes about a range of life science subjects. In 1987, he co-organized an exhibition titled "The Search for Life: Genetic Technology in the 20th Century." This show also was the inaugural exhibition for the DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. He has done video documentaries on the Human Genome Project, the beginning of gene therapy, and the molecular biology of cancer. He holds a PhD in history from the University of Maryland, has authored some three dozen publications-including A Kind of Fate, Agricultural Change in Virginia, 1861-1920 (about the biological consequences of the Civil War and the beginning of germ theory practices, Iowa State University Press, 2000)-and currently is writing a history of molecular medicine. For outreach work, has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the National Foundation for Cancer Research (Bethesda, MD), board member of the Carilion Biomedical Institute (Roanoke, VA), board member, Immune Deficiency Foundation (Towson, MD), and board member, Inova Fairfax Hospital Cancer Advisory Committee (Fairfax, VA).

Currently, his public service includes: board member of the Fund for Inherited Disease Research (Bryn Mawr, PA); and Science Advisor, for the Loudoun County, VA Department of Economic Development, the Clarke County VA Education Foundation, and the Arizona Science Alliance. With his wife Patty, and sons Alex, age 13, and Nicholas, age 17, he lives in Hamilton, Loudoun County, VA.

Disclosure: G. Terry Sharrer, PhD has stock dividends in Merck and Pfizer.

Terry Sharrer's posts:

Computing Cell Fate

October 2, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Computational models to sort out the chaos medium
Subtle differences in transcription factors determine cell behavior in, say, a heart cell [MORE]

Ameliorating Knee Pain with Fat Tissue

October 2, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

 
Lipogems device
Lipogems international SpA is an Italian company (Milan) that makes a liposuction kit for extracting and cleansing fat tissue [MORE]

3-D Printed Implantable Device for Spinal Cord Injury

October 2, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

3D printed stem cells
The video with this piece shows how University of Minnesota researchers were able to 3-D print layers [MORE]

How to Make Organoids

October 2, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

How to make a brain organoid
Betty Crocker couldn’t have been clearer: “To grow brain organoids, researchers have traditionally cultured human [MORE]

Cell Sized Injectable Sensing Robots

October 2, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

 
MIT nanomachines
MIT engineers are building some extremely small electronic devices, with the idea of putting billions of them in the [MORE]

Turbulence Propels Stem Cells into Platelets

October 2, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Turbulence activates platelets
In this case, the “martini” is both shaken and stirred.  Japanese stem cell scientists that “turbulence” in a [MORE]

Smartphone Urinalysis at Home

October 2, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Urinalysis at home
Dipsticks are commonly used in laboratory urinalysis—where a stack of chemical patches on the stick changes color to [MORE]

Printing Transplantable Lungs

September 25, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

3D printed airway
This piece is about a work in progress, with likely a long way to go.  United Therapeutics (Manchester, [MORE]

Synthetic Biology-Based Implantable Optical Biosensor

September 25, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Improving biosensors for implantable sensing
Optical biosensors can be implantable devices that detect a wide range of substances from biomarkers to [MORE]

Harvard’s Lab-Grown Beating Left Ventricle

September 25, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Harvard has grown beating heart
Using a scaffold of biodegradable polyester and gelatin, which then was spun into a cone shape, [MORE]

Implantable Heart Monitor with Smartphone App

September 25, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Implantable heart monitor
Last year, when Abbott Laboratories acquired St. Jude Medical it picked up an implantable heart monitor which already [MORE]

Preserving Blood to Isolate CTCs

September 25, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Liquid biopsy
Several advanced diagnostics for circulating tumor cells exist—such as single cell qPCR, digital PCR and RNA sequencing—but limiting their [MORE]

AI Turned to Cancer Detection in Liquid Biopsy

September 25, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Circulating Tumor DNA
With tumor biopsies, pathologists have a significant amount of tissue to examine, and with DNA sequencing they can [MORE]

Intestinal Organoids for Transplantation in Mice

September 25, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Human intestinal organoids
Several laboratories have been able to grow up functional human “organoids” (of a few hundred cells), but discovered [MORE]