MEDICAL AUTOMATION EXPERTS


Terry Sharrer's bio:

Dr. Sharrer began as Executive Director, Medical Innovation and Transformation Institute, with the Inova Health System (Fairfax, VA) in July 2007. Formerly, he was the Curator of Health Sciences at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, where he had worked for thirty-six years.

Terry Sharrer speaks and writes about a range of life science subjects. In 1987, he co-organized an exhibition titled "The Search for Life: Genetic Technology in the 20th Century." This show also was the inaugural exhibition for the DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. He has done video documentaries on the Human Genome Project, the beginning of gene therapy, and the molecular biology of cancer. He holds a PhD in history from the University of Maryland, has authored some three dozen publications-including A Kind of Fate, Agricultural Change in Virginia, 1861-1920 (about the biological consequences of the Civil War and the beginning of germ theory practices, Iowa State University Press, 2000)-and currently is writing a history of molecular medicine. For outreach work, has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the National Foundation for Cancer Research (Bethesda, MD), board member of the Carilion Biomedical Institute (Roanoke, VA), board member, Immune Deficiency Foundation (Towson, MD), and board member, Inova Fairfax Hospital Cancer Advisory Committee (Fairfax, VA).

Currently, his public service includes: board member of the Fund for Inherited Disease Research (Bryn Mawr, PA); and Science Advisor, for the Loudoun County, VA Department of Economic Development, the Clarke County VA Education Foundation, and the Arizona Science Alliance. With his wife Patty, and sons Alex, age 13, and Nicholas, age 17, he lives in Hamilton, Loudoun County, VA.

Disclosure: G. Terry Sharrer, PhD has stock dividends in Merck and Pfizer.

Terry Sharrer's posts:

Singapore University’s $1 Test for Multiple Diseases

February 5, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

enVision
Human papilloma virus has one hundred subtypes, five of which can cause cervical cancer.  Consequently, a point-of-care microfluidic device that [MORE]

Glucose Powered Device with Cotton Electrodes

February 5, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Cotton based electrodes used in a new biofuel cell
Personal glucometers work by electrically detecting the amount of glucose oxidase in [MORE]

iPSC Transplanted into Parkinson’s Patient

February 5, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Neurons
Last October, Japanese neuroscientists implanted induced pluripotent stem cells into a Parkinson’s patient.  As described: “Kyoto University stem cell researcher [MORE]

Removing Fat, Cellulite and Tattoos with Acoustic Shockwaves

February 5, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Soliton tattoo remova
“Soliton, a company based in Houston, Texas, has developed an acoustic shockwave device to assist in laser tattoo [MORE]

Tissue Chips in Space

February 5, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Small tissue chips in space
Microfluidic chips that mimic human tissues are well established in medical and pharmaceutical research, but using [MORE]

Microgel for Wound Healing

February 5, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Microgel for wound healing
Materials scientists at Michigan Tech have found in their search for a medical “glue” a substance that [MORE]

“Video Vitals”

February 5, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Video Vitals
In regions where epidemic diseases rage, being able to determine vital signs, using a smartphone camera, is a decided [MORE]

First Fully Personalized Tissue Implants

January 29, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Prof. Tal Dvir engineers personalized cells for implants
This piece asserts that researchers at Tel Aviv University have shown how it [MORE]

Smartphone Stethoscope with AI Diagnostic

January 29, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Steth IO
Two weeks ago, MAIN carried a story about Eko’s smart stethoscope—smart because of artificial intelligence and machine learning—that the [MORE]

CRISPR-Based Test for Cardiomyopathy

January 29, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
Most attention to CRISPR-Cas 9 has focused on editing out disease related genes, but this report tells of University [MORE]

New Material for Dialysis

January 29, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Mxeme
MXene, a two dimensional compound only a few atoms thick, first reported in 2011, could be a practical material for [MORE]

Quantum Dots in Single Cell Imaging

January 29, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Quantum dots show mRNA and cell nucleus
“A team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Mayo Clinic [MORE]

Injectable Electronic “Cells”

January 29, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Felice Frankel, MIT Producing cell size robots
This isn’t a “Fantastic Voyage,” but it takes some inspiration from that 1966 movie.  [MORE]

Whole Body 3-D Scanner

January 29, 2019 | | Posted in Newsletter

Explorer scanner – full-body scanner
A whole body scanner, called “Explorer,” combines PET and CT technology into a machine that is [MORE]