MEDICAL AUTOMATION EXPERTS


Terry Sharrer's bio:

Dr. Sharrer began as Executive Director, Medical Innovation and Transformation Institute, with the Inova Health System (Fairfax, VA) in July 2007. Formerly, he was the Curator of Health Sciences at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, where he had worked for thirty-six years.

Terry Sharrer speaks and writes about a range of life science subjects. In 1987, he co-organized an exhibition titled "The Search for Life: Genetic Technology in the 20th Century." This show also was the inaugural exhibition for the DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. He has done video documentaries on the Human Genome Project, the beginning of gene therapy, and the molecular biology of cancer. He holds a PhD in history from the University of Maryland, has authored some three dozen publications-including A Kind of Fate, Agricultural Change in Virginia, 1861-1920 (about the biological consequences of the Civil War and the beginning of germ theory practices, Iowa State University Press, 2000)-and currently is writing a history of molecular medicine. For outreach work, has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the National Foundation for Cancer Research (Bethesda, MD), board member of the Carilion Biomedical Institute (Roanoke, VA), board member, Immune Deficiency Foundation (Towson, MD), and board member, Inova Fairfax Hospital Cancer Advisory Committee (Fairfax, VA).

Currently, his public service includes: board member of the Fund for Inherited Disease Research (Bryn Mawr, PA); and Science Advisor, for the Loudoun County, VA Department of Economic Development, the Clarke County VA Education Foundation, and the Arizona Science Alliance. With his wife Patty, and sons Alex, age 13, and Nicholas, age 17, he lives in Hamilton, Loudoun County, VA.

Disclosure: G. Terry Sharrer, PhD has stock dividends in Merck and Pfizer.

Terry Sharrer's posts:

Reading Brainwaves from Inside the Skull

September 4, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Neuro chip
“Researchers at Purdue University have now developed a brain-reading implant that’s incredibly small and that doesn’t need any on-board batteries [MORE]

X-ray, Nanobubble Delivery of Anticancer Chemo

September 4, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Dr. Wei-Deng researching nanobubbles
“Nanobubbles,” aka liposomes, have shown usefulness in drug delivery before, but their limitation has been in tissue [MORE]

Detecting Alzheimer’s Decades Earlier

September 4, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Beta amyloid plaque
Misfolded amyloid beta, forming plaques, has long been suspected as a key to understanding how Alzheimer’s disease causes [MORE]

A “Smart Stent” that Monitors Arterial Conditions

September 4, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

UBC smart stent
Electrical and computer engineers at the University of British Columbia have created “the first angioplasty-ready smart stent.”  “[They] modified [MORE]

Capturing Tumor Cells on a Magnetic Wire

September 4, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

 
Magnetized wire captures tumor cells
Stanford University bioengineers have designed a method for capturing circulating tumor cells in the blood stream. Their approach [MORE]

A Genome in a Day

September 4, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

DNA
In living cells, a special polymerase named “terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase” (TdT) adds about a thousand nucleotides per second to a [MORE]

Nanocrystals and Microparticles to Treat Osteoarthritis

September 4, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Treating osteoarthritis
The ancient Greeks who coined the phrase “misery loves company” may well have been talking about osteoarthritis—an affliction that [MORE]

Printing Muscles and Tendons

August 28, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Microplate for printing muscles and tendons
Using 3-D bioprinting and a novel microplate, biochemical engineers in Zurich and Basel were able to [MORE]

Automated Cell Culture

August 28, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

eVOLVER
With a relatively inexpensive set up, a bioengineer at Rice University built an automated cell culture prototype that controlled timing, temperature [MORE]

A Regenerative Bandage

August 28, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Regenerative bandage promotes wound healing
Sores for a diabetic take longer to heal than with a non-diabetic person.  For that situation, [MORE]

IoT for the research laboratory

August 28, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Internet of things
The Internet of Things (IoT) suggests that it is possible to integrate any number of devices or information [MORE]

Patch Delivers Drugs Directly to Heart

August 28, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Heart patch drug delivery
In order to get drugs, proteins or stem cells to the heart after an infarction, a collaboration [MORE]

Automated Robotic Phlebotomy/Analysis

August 28, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

End to end blood testing device
“. . . researchers at Rutgers University created a device that includes an image-guided venipuncture robot, [MORE]

Powering Brain Implants with Radio Waves

August 28, 2018 | | Posted in Newsletter

Wireless charging of medical devices
“Scientists at MIT have developed a wireless system that can power tiny implantable devices in the body, [MORE]